Skip to Main Content »

Spring / Summer: Jetty Island

This little island just 30min north of Seattle, off the Everett waterfront is fast becoming the NW's best beach for learning and riding. With its wide shallow water beach its ideal for kiteboard training at any level. It receives steady and predictable sea breezes almost every afternoon into the evening between April and September. With smooth winds, shallow/warm water, a sandy clean beach and miles of open bay, entry level riders learn the basics quickly. The island is owned and operated by the Port of Everett. Its use is split between recreation and serving as a refuge for 45 species of birds. For this reason Urban Surf has sought and been granted use of the property to conduct our IKO-Approved Kiteboarding Training Program. Be sure your school / instructor are approved to teach at your local site or they could be putting the site at risk for future access.

There is a Parking Fee of $3 at the 10th st boat launch were we meet.

For more information about kiteboarding on Jetty Island, contact Jeffro.
For park information, call: 425-257-8304

 

Island Restrictions & Guidelines

Jetty Island is a special place! It’s one of the greatest kiteboarding beaches in the country. It’s also a desirable place for many other types of visitors including families & protective wildlife. Please familiarize yourself with the restrictions and guidelines below before you go. It will ensure that the island remains a fun and safe place for all to enjoy.

  • No pets or bikes
  • Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.
  • There is little cover on the island, so bring sunscreen and water.
  • Alcohol is prohibited on Jetty Island during “Jetty Island Days” and brings a $1000 fine to violators.
  • Kiteboarders, as a general rule, should set up equipment on the far North end and ride well out of the way of any beachgoers, the 2-3 line length as a safety buffer rule should always apply. If its your fist time Kiteboarding on Jetty Island please ask other riders about launching and no riding zones as described below.
 

Jetty Island Zone Map

While there are no formal kiteboarding restrictions at Jetty Island, kiteboarders are urged to observe these 3 main zones of usage. The kiting community has worked closely with the Parks and Port regulations to determine these zones. If you are new to the island, please familiarize yourself with this map, and get to know island etiquette by asking other riders about rigging, launching and no-riding zones. It will go a long way in ensuring unrestricted and future use of the PNW’s premier riding location.

zone 1: school launch

Located at the far north end of the island, this area is locally known as the “learning” area. If you’re taking a lesson, this is where you’ll be rigging & launching. It’s a slightly more open area that allows students to learn and progress in a safer area without the distractions and congestion of the Main Launch, and well away from beachgoers that frequent the Swimming Area.

zone 2: main launch

This part of the beach directly west of the lagoon is Kite Beach, Kite Central, and on busy days, Kite Nation. Most independent riders will rig and launch here. Be advised that on busy summer days this area can become very congested with kiters and gear - especially at high tide. If you have rigged gear on the beach, always roll up your lines and “stack” your kites whenever possible.

zone 3: swimming area

IT IS NEVER PERMISSIBLE TO RIG, LAUNCH, OR RIDE IN THIS AREA during Jetty Island DAYS (JULY + AUG)! If an accident were to occur in this zone between kiter and beachgoer, it would put our access as kiteboarders in severe jeopardy. Riding access is limited to a distance of 100 yards or more offshore from the active tidal line (drastically fluctuates), and only from prior launch from zones 1 or 2.

 

History

Jetty Island is 2-mile-long by half-mile-wide man-made island that lies just off the Everett waterfront. A free summer ferry transports visitors about every half-hour across the Snohomish River channel until Sept. 5. The island was created at the turn of the last century by dredging in an ill-fated plan to create a freshwater harbor. The island now serves as a refuge for 45 species of birds. The west side of the island features a gently sloping beach that extends far out into Puget Sound, with the shallow water warmed to pleasant wading temperatures. A short trail wanders south of the ranger station; visitors are requested to keep to the beaches further north to protect the inland habitat.

 

Jetty Island: Crossing the Channel

It really IS an Island, but only 50m from the Everett waterfront and 10th St Boat launch. So, while you may need to add a small boat to your quiver, there are several other options as well.

1) Urban Surf Red Jetski Transport

If you are doing a lesson with us, transport is provided via our RED Jetskis.

photo: jim stringfellow.com
 

2) Kayaks / Canoes

Many riders opt to be more independent and come equipped with extra gear like a kayak, or canoe. Be advised that a Coast Guard approved Life Jacket and whistle is required. Without them, you will be subject to an $85 fine and turned back by the Harbor Police. Also be prepared for a vigorous paddle as you will be crossing a river mouth, which during tidal exchanges can have very strong current. Once across, please be mindful that the dock is there for boat & ferry moorage, not as a parking lot for your ride! It is advised that you stow your kayak / canoe on the island shore instead.

photo: jim stringfellow.com
 

3) Jetty Island Ferry

The Jetty Island Free Ferry runs every summer from July 4th thru Labor Day. The ferry runs every half hour but can fill up quickly on busy summer days leading to 2-3 boat waits. On these busy days your gear may be limited by the crew. The last boat off the island is usually around 5:30pm which is typically when the wind is best for Kiteboarders. Don’t get stuck without a ride back!

image courtesy everett marina
 

4) stand up paddle

For thrill seekers, there’s always the Stand-Up Paddleboard option! While we don’t condone this method of transport (especially during a big tidal exchange when the current is ripping!), it is a viable option if you have the gear, experience, and are up for the challenge. You’ll never get skunked at Jetty again! TIP: Check the tides and know how it affects the current before you go.

photo: JOAQUIN HUBBARD

 

Wind Forecast